Photo from the Field: NeoNatalie Newborn Educational Mannequin

Photos from the Field: NeoNatalie Newborn Educational Mannequin

Neonatalie Newborn Educational Mannequin (dark skin)

In low-resource settings across the globe midwives are learning about the critical first hour after birth that can keep more newborns alive through Helping Babies Breathe training. In Yetoban, Ethiopia at Project Mercy midwives take skills labs classes that will utilize the NeoNatalie Newborn educational mannequin. Midwifery training at Project Mercy is through a partnership between Jhpiego,…

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Photos from the Field: Expectant Mother Seeks Help in “Lie and Wait” House #Ethiopia

Photos from the Field: Expectant Mother Seeks Help in “Lie and Wait” House #Ethiopia

Women in Lie and Wait Home

Expectant woman, Ayelech Fikadu, and her mother, Zarge Badunga sit in a “lie and wait” house at Project Mercy outside of Butajira, Ethiopia. The house was recently renovated by USAID and Pathfinder.

Butajira is located in Ethiopia’s southern highlands where many live in the mountains. Women who live in the mountains have a difficult time delivering their babies at a hospital or health center due…

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Photo From the Field: Nine-Day-Old Newborn

Photo From the Field: Nine-Day Old Newborn

Mosebo Village

9daynewborn

This woman in Mosebo village, 43 kilometers from Bahir Dar, Ethiopia, holds her nine-day-old baby and quickly quiets him by breastfeeding him in her home.

Save the Childrenis working diligently with the Ethiopian Federal Government to properly train health extension workers and provide continuing education for the workers to help save the lives of vulnerable newborns. Through its…

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Photo from the Field: Child Marriage

Photo from the Field: Child Marriage

Mother - arranged marriage

Child Marriage

This is a young, expectant mother who lives near Butajira, Ethiopia. She was married at 13 and will deliver her first child at 15. She walked to this lie and wait house (pictured above) because of excessive bleeding. She lives 3 minutes in the mountains of southern Ethiopia. She has never seen a health extension worker and has never been to a health post. Her experience, once again, underscores…

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How Ethiopia is Scaling Midwifery to Save More Mothers, Newborns

SONY DSC

Addis Ababa- In Ethiopia there are 4.9 million pregnancies each year of which 84% take place in rural areas. Here in Ethiopia, where the vast majority of women deliver at home, only 32% of maternal, newborn and child health needs are being met by midwives according to the newly released State of Midwifery Report. That is troubling for a country that is making noticeable strides to save its women…

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jenniferjames:

How do you help health workers save more newborn lives? You show them. 
Photo: Jennifer JamesApril 2014 Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

jenniferjames:

How do you help health workers save more newborn lives? You show them. 

Photo: Jennifer James
April 2014 
Bahir Dar, Ethiopia

This week child survival is under critical review in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the African Leadership for Child Survival – A Promise Renewed summit. This meeting, held at the African Union headquarters and convened by the Ethiopian government along with UNICEF and USAID brought together African Ministers of Health to enter into discussions about markedly improving child survival rates. The summit ends Friday. (via Under Five Child Survival Under Microscope at Summit – Mom Bloggers for Social Good)

This week child survival is under critical review in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia during the African Leadership for Child Survival – A Promise Renewed summit. This meeting, held at the African Union headquarters and convened by the Ethiopian government along with UNICEF and USAID brought together African Ministers of Health to enter into discussions about markedly improving child survival rates. The summit ends Friday. (via Under Five Child Survival Under Microscope at Summit – Mom Bloggers for Social Good)

In speaking to health workers while on an observation trip to Ethiopia this month with Save the Children I repeatedly asked about access to medial supplies – from family planning supplies to medications for malaria, for example – and every health worker in every village I asked said the supplies were plenty. They were quite nonchalant about my inquiries, in fact, which signaled to me that whatever medical supplies the health workers need they can get. Running water and health posts with electric power are entirely different stories, however. (via Counting Medical Supplies in Africa – Mom Bloggers for Social Good)

In speaking to health workers while on an observation trip to Ethiopia this month with Save the Children I repeatedly asked about access to medial supplies – from family planning supplies to medications for malaria, for example – and every health worker in every village I asked said the supplies were plenty. They were quite nonchalant about my inquiries, in fact, which signaled to me that whatever medical supplies the health workers need they can get. Running water and health posts with electric power are entirely different stories, however. (via Counting Medical Supplies in Africa – Mom Bloggers for Social Good)

When you visit developing countries where there is widespread cookstove use you will see children who have a lot of mucus in their noses. Cookstove smoke causes increased risk of pneumonia, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and heart disease. And 2 million people die every year because of indoor health pollution. (via The Importance of Clean Cookstoves – A Personal Experience – Mom Bloggers for Social Good)

When you visit developing countries where there is widespread cookstove use you will see children who have a lot of mucus in their noses. Cookstove smoke causes increased risk of pneumonia, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and heart disease. And 2 million people die every year because of indoor health pollution. (via The Importance of Clean Cookstoves – A Personal Experience – Mom Bloggers for Social Good)

Time after time during our trip with Save the Children to observe frontline health workers, hopes were high after visiting health facilities in Ethiopia. The sheer dedication of the health workers who provide lifesaving care for their community was palpable, but the harsh reality remains: resources and equipment are needed in greater quantities in order to save more lives. (via Day 4 in Ethiopia: U.S. Nurses See Local Health Facilities Up Close | Impatient Optimists)

Time after time during our trip with Save the Children to observe frontline health workers, hopes were high after visiting health facilities in Ethiopia. The sheer dedication of the health workers who provide lifesaving care for their community was palpable, but the harsh reality remains: resources and equipment are needed in greater quantities in order to save more lives. (via Day 4 in Ethiopia: U.S. Nurses See Local Health Facilities Up Close | Impatient Optimists)

One of the most startling facts I learned while in Ethiopia is that 90% of all births take place at home even though health extension workers are trained to perform safe and clean deliveries in every corner of the country. The maternal mortality ratio in Ethiopia is 676 for every 100,000 births, according to the World Health Organization, a number that has not budged in the last five years despite country-wide interventions implementation by the Ethiopian Ministry of Health and NGOs, like Save the Children. Still only 6 percent of births are attended by skilled birth attendants. (via Delivery Rooms in Ethiopian Health Posts, Centers, and Hospitals | Perspectives & Reflections with Jennifer James)

One of the most startling facts I learned while in Ethiopia is that 90% of all births take place at home even though health extension workers are trained to perform safe and clean deliveries in every corner of the country. The maternal mortality ratio in Ethiopia is 676 for every 100,000 births, according to the World Health Organization, a number that has not budged in the last five years despite country-wide interventions implementation by the Ethiopian Ministry of Health and NGOs, like Save the Children. Still only 6 percent of births are attended by skilled birth attendants. (via Delivery Rooms in Ethiopian Health Posts, Centers, and Hospitals | Perspectives & Reflections with Jennifer James)

An underlying theme I have taken away from this observational trip is that learning by modeling healthy behavior is key to ensuring sustainable health outcomes. (via Two Model Ethiopian Families | Perspectives & Reflections with Jennifer James)

An underlying theme I have taken away from this observational trip is that learning by modeling healthy behavior is key to ensuring sustainable health outcomes. (via Two Model Ethiopian Families | Perspectives & Reflections with Jennifer James)

Save the Children recently launched the Every Beat Matters campaign that shines a much-needed, and well-deserved spotlight on health workers in developing countries. It is through these health workers that newborn and child care can be improved. Access to proper and consistent care is a perpetual obstacle in countries where health workers are scarce. In many middle income and poor countries, particularly in rural areas, there may be one lone health worker for 10,000 people or more. This in itself is a gargantuan task for those who desperately need access to quality care. Community health workers also tend to care for their patients with much fewer supplies, medicines, and technology than what we are accustomed to in the States, posing yet another mammoth problem for health workers’ ability to provide care. (via Why I am In Ethiopia This Week | Perspectives & Reflections with Jennifer James)

Save the Children recently launched the Every Beat Matters campaign that shines a much-needed, and well-deserved spotlight on health workers in developing countries. It is through these health workers that newborn and child care can be improved. Access to proper and consistent care is a perpetual obstacle in countries where health workers are scarce. In many middle income and poor countries, particularly in rural areas, there may be one lone health worker for 10,000 people or more. This in itself is a gargantuan task for those who desperately need access to quality care. Community health workers also tend to care for their patients with much fewer supplies, medicines, and technology than what we are accustomed to in the States, posing yet another mammoth problem for health workers’ ability to provide care. (via Why I am In Ethiopia This Week | Perspectives & Reflections with Jennifer James)

(via Day 3 in Ethiopia: What Do We Need to Save Newborns’ Lives? | Impatient Optimists)
“Neonatal mortality is still high,” said Dr. Hailu Tesfaye, Director of Save the Children’s Hawassa office. “We need to focus on newborn interventions to get the child health MDG down.”

(via Day 3 in Ethiopia: What Do We Need to Save Newborns’ Lives? | Impatient Optimists)

“Neonatal mortality is still high,” said Dr. Hailu Tesfaye, Director of Save the Children’s Hawassa office. “We need to focus on newborn interventions to get the child health MDG down.”