New Report on Child Mortality Trends Released

Today a collaborative report on trends in child mortality was released by the World Bank, UNICEF, the United Nations and the World Health Organization. According to the Levels and Trends in Child Mortalityreport, child mortality has dropped by 49 percent since 1990. Even so, Millennium Development Goal 4 (MDG 4) has yet to be reached. In fact, if current trends persist only Latin America, the…

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How You Can Send Children to School in Laos, Guatemala and Ghana

Education, it is often said, is the key to a child’s future. When a child in low and middle-income countries goes to school, their future income…

As a mother of three children age 4 and under, I understand the meaning of a full day of work at home, and my kids are healthy. They were all born at well-equipped hospitals with educated staff and access to any medicine they may have needed. In fact, my oldest daughter was born via an emergency c-section; without our access to quality health care she and I may not have survived her birth.

 It may be surprise you, like it did me, that a staggering 18,000 children die every day from preventable causes and over one million newborns do not make it past their first day of life, with newborns accounting for 4 out of 5 deaths of children under the age of 5. These numbers are too high and we need to work together to make a positive change.

The United Nations Millenium Development Goals (MDGs) look to reduce preventable child deaths by two thirds by 2015. We as a global community need to invest in women of all ages and provide them with the education and care they need to succeed. Reaching out to women and girls in countries with the poorest access to high quality health care will make a huge impact in the future of our universe.

I believe that access to quality health care is a RIGHT for girls and women regardless of where they live, not a privilege. Please visit http://www.savethechildren.net/mdg500 and become accountable. 

In the Indian subcontinent, early child death was very high. We have heard our grandmothers use to give birth 11 to 13 (sometimes 18) kids in their life. Now we may get shaken, but this was very natural scenario of this continent. Because they get married in early age (mostly in childhood) and then started giving birth of kids. But finally they had 4 to 5 (sometimes 8) kids alive. Rest of them became dead in their childhood. There are many reasons behind it. First, mom didn’t have time and energy to take care of the kid, lack of nutrition, lack of knowledge (how to raise them properly), no health care etc.

Then our mom’s generation came. In this generation we see, moms use to take 4/5 kids in their life. Reason was, they got married after 18, they are educated enough to raise their kid. Though, they also faced problem to raise kids because of time and energy. Some of them were also working woman. And if we ask them we will see they also had lost 1 or 2 kids. Main reason they faced, is less availability of vaccines and work pressure. Read more
In the Indian subcontinent, early child death was very high. We have heard our grandmothers use to give birth 11 to 13 (sometimes 18) kids in their life. Now we may get shaken, but this was very natural scenario of this continent. Because they get married in early age (mostly in childhood) and then started giving birth of kids. But finally they had 4 to 5 (sometimes 8) kids alive. Rest of them became dead in their childhood. There are many reasons behind it. First, mom didn’t have time and energy to take care of the kid, lack of nutrition, lack of knowledge (how to raise them properly), no health care etc.
Then our mom’s generation came. In this generation we see, moms use to take 4/5 kids in their life. Reason was, they got married after 18, they are educated enough to raise their kid. Though, they also faced problem to raise kids because of time and energy. Some of them were also working woman. And if we ask them we will see they also had lost 1 or 2 kids. Main reason they faced, is less availability of vaccines and work pressure. Read more
“Each day an estimated 800 mothers and 18,000 young children die from largely preventable causes.”
That’s a daunting statistic when there’s plenty that can be done, considering the gift modern medicine can bring to nations. There was a rather peculiar question posed to me, “Why do you believe saving lives of newborns and children in developing countries is important to me.” The question was peculiar in nature because it seemed like a no brainer. How could I not value the lives of innocent children or the women who work so diligently for 9 months to give them life? Why is this even an issue? Well, I’m here to give voice to the countless women and newborns who have lost their life due to inadequate or non-existent healthcare. Read more!

“Each day an estimated 800 mothers and 18,000 young children die from largely preventable causes.”

That’s a daunting statistic when there’s plenty that can be done, considering the gift modern medicine can bring to nations. There was a rather peculiar question posed to me, “Why do you believe saving lives of newborns and children in developing countries is important to me.” The question was peculiar in nature because it seemed like a no brainer. How could I not value the lives of innocent children or the women who work so diligently for 9 months to give them life? Why is this even an issue? Well, I’m here to give voice to the countless women and newborns who have lost their life due to inadequate or non-existent healthcare. Read more!

Summer 2014: Approaching Life Deliberately

jwschiff:

Sometimes I feel like the seasons have a theme. Since it’s Labor Day here in the U.S. — the unofficial end of summer and correspondingly, the start of autumn — I’m reflecting on the last few months and examining whether there was a unifying thought or idea.

For me, there definitely was:…

Human Rights Watch Explores the Lives of Indian Women Who Clean Human Waste

Lalibai_Cremation_Grounds

Lalibai stands by the entrance to the village cremation grounds. Before she took action, villagers had forbidden members of her community to cremate their dead here. © 2014 Digvijay Singh

Can you imagine getting up every morning to clean human waste from dry toilets (those without running water or that are not attached to a septic system) day after day without pay? And, while the work is…

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Vividly, I remember the smell of filth and dirty diapers as I walked into the small orphanage in Montego Bay, Jamaica. I was all of 14 years old and had lived a life of privilege. I held a tiny baby who had just arrived and had yet to be named. In my mind, I named him Josiah. I couldn’t imagine why someone wouldn’t want him. I was told that life in the orphanage was better than the one of extreme poverty he would face with his birth mother.  Read more

Vividly, I remember the smell of filth and dirty diapers as I walked into the small orphanage in Montego Bay, Jamaica. I was all of 14 years old and had lived a life of privilege. I held a tiny baby who had just arrived and had yet to be named. In my mind, I named him Josiah. I couldn’t imagine why someone wouldn’t want him. I was told that life in the orphanage was better than the one of extreme poverty he would face with his birth mother.  Read more

Introducing Our Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health Correspondents

Midwives for Haiti Mobile Clinic

As our work continues to expand globally especially as the MDG deadline nears in 2015 we want to ensure that international voices are the cornerstone of our coverage of maternal, newborn, and child health worldwide. We are beginning with three correspondents: Winfred Ogdom, a nutritionist from Uganda, Maryanne Waweru-Wanyama, a motherhood blogger and journalist from Nairobi, Kenya, and Midwives…

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Logistics Team Visits South Sudan to Assess Road Conditions Amid Looming Famine

Last month, a United Nations team travelled to Western Equitoria,  Central Equatoria, and Western Bahr El Ghazal in South Sudan to assess road conditions, an important task when famine looms in a region that is mostly agrarian. Without passable roads it is impossible for lifesaving, critical health supplies, health workers, aid agencies,  and most importantly food to reach remote areas that are…

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Join Us for a Twitter Chat About Child Health and #MDG4

SONY DSC

MDG4August 18, 2014marks 500 days to reach the Millennium Development Goals, the set of goals signed into action in September 2000 to reduce extreme poverty in a variety of topic areas from eradicating poverty to ensuring environmental sustainability. MDG 4, or reduce child mortality, laid out a concrete goal to reduce child mortality by two-thirds starting with data collected from 1990. MDG 4 has…

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Glimpses of Hope

vitaminangels:

Every day I sit at my desk, typing away, researching, planning, and making connections with people around the world. But being so physically removed from the children I’m helping can sometimes make me question the impact of my efforts.

How can a photo I post on social media or a connection on…

Sharing Moms’ Stories for #WorldBreastfeeding Week: Ebony #WBW2014

Sharing Moms’ Stories for #WorldBreastfeeding Week: Ebony #WBW2014

Mom's Stories (14)

Today marks the end of World Breastfeeding Week, but we still have more breastfeeding stories to share after today. We believe that moms help fellow moms through personal stories. That’s why we will continue to share the breastfeeding experiences of new and experienced moms. No one wants to feel alone at 2 AM in the morning when you’re feeding your baby and hoping you’re doing everything right.

Y…

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